INSIDE PREMIUM: Bored to DeathSeptember 14, 2009


INSIDE PREMIUM: Bored to Death

HBO

INSIDE PREMIUM will keep you up-to-date on the Premieres, Finales, and everything in between that is available at your choosing on Premium VOD. This Week
  • Bored to Death Premiere
  • Nurse Jackie Sneak Peek
  • Doubt Sneak Peek…

Read More

Will LISTEN UP PHILIP Get Your Attention?October 16, 2014


Will LISTEN UP PHILIP Get Your Attention?

LISTEN UP PHILIP (Tribeca)

On Demand Weekly provides new movie reviews of hot movies on demand from the POV of watching from the comfort of your home. Today's review: LISTEN UP PHILIP (Tribeca).

Considering that writing is such a singular pursuit, it’s ironic that chasing the elusive muse has long been fodder for film fiction. From WONDER BOYS to BARTON FINK to MIDNIGHT IN PARIS, writers toiling over their works have populated film since the birth of the medium. The life of the scribe is examined once again in Alex Ross Perry’s LISTEN UP PHILIP.

Perry’s film focuses on one Philip Lewis Friedman, (Jason Schwartzman, THE DARJEELING LIMITED) a Brooklyn-based novelist living with his increasingly disengaged photographer girlfriend (Elisabeth Moss, THE ONE I LOVE).

Once something of an enfant terrible and now just a terrible adult, Philip is a narcissistic, self-obsessed writer methodically destroying every one of his relationships, whether romantic, platonic or professional. In need of both a place to work and and an escape valve, Philip accepts an invitation from once-great novelist Ike Zimmerman (Jonathan Pryce, PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: AT WORLD’S END), to stay at Zimmerman’s country house for a spell.

 

 

Jonathan Pryce and Jason Schwartzman in Listen Up Philip distributed by Tribeca Film.


Once Perry places the two scribes within close proximity of one another, it becomes clear that literary talent isn’t the only thing they have in common. The bitterness and dissatisfaction that both Philip and Ike exude makes them kindred assholes, with each considered such by Ike’s angry daughter (Krysten Ritter, "Breaking Bad"). Her encounters with the two novelists are marked by a surly churlishness that Ritter conveys without alienating herself to the audience.

 

 

Krysten Ritter in Listen Up Philip distributed by Tribeca Film.


Schwartzman imbues Philip with a measure of vulnerability that keeps him from being totally irredeemable; he employs the same inflated sense of self that we saw from him in RUSHMORE, keeping the world at arm’s length as a defense mechanism. It’s a daring, if not altogether pleasant performance.

Read More

Page 1 of 1 pages

banner_160x600