SING ME THE SONGS THAT SAY I LOVE YOU: A CONCERT FOR KATE MCGARRIGLEOctober 02, 2013


SING ME THE SONGS THAT SAY I LOVE YOU: A CONCERT FOR KATE MCGARRIGLE

SING ME THE SONGS THAT SAY I LOVE YOU (Sundance Artist Services)

On Demand Weekly provides new reviews of hot movies and shows on demand from the POV of watching from the comfort of your home. Today’s review: “SING ME THE SONGS THAT SAY I LOVE YOU: A CONCERT FOR KATE MCGARRIGLE.” is now on demand. 

 

In May, 2011, a memorial concert was held in New York City’s historic Town Hall for Canadian singer/songwriter Kate McGarrigle. Headlined by her incredibly talented offspring, Rufus and Martha Wainwright, the concert of McGarrigle’s music, including both the well known and some obscure songs, is full of extraordinary performances by her family, her extended family and close friends. Family was definitely the theme of the evening, and the love they all feel for Kate, each other, and the music comes through every note and every breath. That the concert was filmed is fantastic news for McGarrigle/Wainwright fans.

Now available digitally through the Sundance Institute Artist Services Program, the concert includes full length renditions of the songs along with interviews, archival footage, recordings and photos of the extended McGarrigle clan. Getting the background of some of her songs makes their meaning deeper, and hearing the songs filtered through the experience of Kate’s death adds even more levels of poignancy. The last song Kate McGarrigle wrote, Proserpina, about a mother who wants her daughter to come back from Hades is especially moving as song by her children, obviously longing for their deceased mother, with lush background vocals by the rest of the extended family.

 



Unfortunately, filmmaker Lian Lunson makes some awkward edits and bizarre choices of intros and exits. Many performers are never named, which is frustrating, and if, as she has been quoted, the point of the film was to bring Kate McGarrigle’s music to a broader audience, the lack of labeling would make it difficult for, say, a fan of Justin Vivian Bond, or Norah Jones, to find this film. 

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