REBIRTH - A 9/11 Docuementary That Is More Than A FilmSeptember 21, 2011


REBIRTH - A 9/11 Docuementary That Is More Than A Film

Oscilloscope Labs

On Demand Weekly provides new movie reviews of hot movies on demand and from the POV of watching from the comfort of your home. Today’s review: IREBIRTH (Oscilliscope).

 

REBIRTH

By John Werner

 

Tenth anniversary remembrances of 9/11 are everywhere, from a multitude of TV specials, radio retrospectives, newspaper reports to speeches and dedications. I even saw a commemorative car dealership ad. I dare say it’s ubiquitous and in some cases disquieting. As a result, I’ve been asking myself why ten years is so significant. Why do most of these TV specials and movies have to be released now? Why not five years ago? Or a year ago?

Then I saw REBIRTH, Jim Whitaker’s feature-length documentary, and remembered the adage, time heals all wounds and realized that this particular tribute couldn’t happen at a better time. REBIRTH has to be seen now. It is significant to the ten-year anniversary of 9/11 in a way that I’m not sure any other tribute could be. The film is a beautifully executed tribute to the strength of the human spirit and our amazing ability to heal.

 



Whitaker has been making the film for a decade following the lives of five people who suffered deeply from the events of that day - Nick a teenager the day his mother was killed; Brian, whose brother was a first responder; Tim, a firefighter who lost too many colleagues; Ling, a severely burned survivor from an impact floor and Tanya who lost her fiancé that day. Since 2002, they shared their life story, their living-history of 9/11, with Whitaker. REBIRTH also parallels the rebuilding of these lives with the rebuilding of ground zero featuring unique and ambitious multi-camera time-lapse footage of the site.

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Oscilloscope Labs FOUR LOVERS Is On Demand Before TheatersFebruary 02, 2012


Oscilloscope Labs FOUR LOVERS  Is On Demand Before Theaters

Oscilloscope Labs

On Demand Weekly provides new movie reviews of movies on demand from the POV of watching from the comfort of your home. Today’s review: FOUR LOVERS (Oscilloscope Labs).

 

FOUR LOVERS
By Amy Slotnick

 

Ever wish there was a way to inject a solid, long-term relationship with the sexual hunger of a new lover? Or fantasize about having a passionate affair without sneaking around and potentially betraying the trust of your spouse? That is exactly what two couples explore in FOUR LOVERS, a couple-swap French film now available On Demand before a theatrical run.

It initially seems to happen so easily. Work colleagues, Rachel and Vincent, go out along with their spouses, Franck and Teri. The two couples become fast friends and a sexual energy soon emerges. There is little attempt to hide it, except from their kids, and soon each couple has swapped partners, regularly meeting for dinner parties, weekends away and private rendezvous’ for lovemaking.

 



While having a new lover intoxicates each character, they also each maintain an equal commitment to their marriages. Surprisingly, the partner swap also seems to renew the passion of the married relationships.

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WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT KEVIN - Now On DemandMay 23, 2012


WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT KEVIN - Now On Demand

Oscilloscope

On Demand Weekly provides new movie reviews of hot movies on demand from the POV of watching from the comfort of your home. Today’s review: WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT KEVIN (Oscilloscope Labs).


WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT KEVIN
A mother’s love doesn’t always cut it…
By Cynthia Kane

 

WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT KEVIN instantly elicits haunting reminders of the premeditated high school massacre at Columbine now some thirteen years ago. I remember at the time wondering where the parents were in all this, and how could they live with themselves after the tragedy, the graphic murders and suicides. How does a parent go on? How do they look at themselves in the mirror knowing they gave life to a killer, a sick, psychotic mind? Does the tragedy in the end lie with themselves?

A few years later, I was listening to a BBC World Service radio program where they were discussing Lionel Shriver’s 2003 novel, We Need to Talk About Kevin after which I ran out to a bookstore, bought and read in one sitting. Disquieting and provocative, this novel searches into the mind and soul of one such mother trying to understand the reason as to why her 15 year-old son murders not only his classmates and teachers, but his overly loving father and younger sister in a single day. Thus I have been waiting many more years for this film to be made and when I heard Scottish filmmaker Lynne Ramsay (RATCATCHER, MORVERN CALLAR) would adapt the screenplay from the novel, direct and Tilda Swinton would play the role of Eva, the mother, I knew it would not disappoint.

What’s uncommon and extraordinary here is Ramsay takes the novel and makes the film her own and a more suitable or honorable adaptation I cannot imagine. The book and the film live singularly on their own, but respect each other simultaneously. Ramsay’s reoccurring themes in her work: the inveterate, unresolvable themes of grief, guilt and, above all, death and its aftermath, belong here in this tale where a mother in the days, months, weeks, maybe even years after her child’s heinous crimes tries to make sense of it all.

 



It took Lynne Ramsay a long time to make this film. A great and complicated book is never easy to adapt. As seen by Eva’s point of view, it’s difficult to grasp her as a completely reliable narrator as she’s reflecting after-the-fact, trying to understand what happened, what might have changed things, was it her fault or is her son simply a psychotic psychopath for whom nothing could have been done to change the tragic unfolding of events. We are along for the ride, inside of the head of a mother, a woman destroyed by her son’s actions, trying to make sense of it with her. It’s at once a thriller, a cautionary tale.

 

It rises to the level of classical tragedy.

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THE OTHER F WORD On Demand - Father Knows BestJune 14, 2012


THE OTHER F WORD On Demand - Father Knows Best

Oscilloscope Labs

On Demand Weekly provides new movie reviews of hot movies on demand and from the POV of watching from the comfort of your home. Today’s review: THE OTHER F WORD (Oscilloscope Labs).

 

Editor's Note: THE OTHER F WORD can be seen on Showtime (June 14, 2012).

 

THE OTHER F WORD

By Chris Claro

 

Punk rock has always been about rebellion: sticking it to the man, telling society to go to hell, making sure that people just don’t understand, man! At its core, punk is anti-authoritarian, anti-government, anti-establishment, not the environs for such bourgeois pursuits as parenthood – “Father knows best? Father knows nothing!”

 


But even punks grow up, despite their attempts to the contrary. And no matter how hard they may have moshed or how badly they courted attention with choices in hair, ink, and accessories, punks age just as the rest of us do, and with age often comes the desire for something more fulfilling, something more than where to go eat after a gig. That something, as many of us squares know, is fatherhood.

THE OTHER F WORD, produced by Morgan Spurlock and directed by Andrea Blaugrund Nevins, is a rollicking doc about what happens when punks become parents. Though it sounds like the idea for a bad pilot starring Michael Rappaport and Jason Lee, THE OTHER F WORD is funny, insightful, and even touching, as it plays up the ironic dichotomy of post-40 punkers who need to maintain their bad-ass stage cred even though most of them are toast-making homebodies who find it increasingly difficult to go on tour.

 



Blaugrund traces the rise of punk in southern California, through the recollections of everyone from Flea to Art Alexakis to Mark Hoppus.

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